gwendolyn faith is not a crayon.

Hello, I’m Gwen.

I work in advertising. I play in the kitchen.

I’m part tweenager. (Look at my iTunes playlist.)

I’m part Grandma. (Look at my oversize cardi collection.)

I’m part Romy or Michelle. (Look at the height of my hair.)

As a Christian, I'm learning how to glorify God in the everyday. To live into the status quo, like Jesus' own Manchurian candidate, and seep grace through its cracks.

I wish my life were a musical, but other than that, I’m pretty content.

(No surprise I also like to Yelp.)

The Casual Vacancy
The Explicit Gospel
Freedom
Gone Girl
The Chaperone
Cutting for Stone


Gwen Daniels's favorite books »


electronicsquid:

University of Missouri

(Peter Stackpole. 1949)

(via vivacious-still-life)

Although I’d planned to go to a friend’s lake house for the weekend, I stayed in town to take care of some business at home and for work. Luckily for me, I got to celebrate Denise’s birthday at Blokes and Birds’ karaoke lounge! Denise gave such a spirited rendition of a Lil Wayne rap, she even inspired a man in the audience to—well, to shed his clothes. Happy birthday to you, Dee!

jeffslist:

"The mystery of the ordinary" by Magritte @ the Chicago Art Museum tonight. #chicago #art by _dpark http://ift.tt/1pp26Y7

I’d recommend the Art Institute’s Magritte exhibit to anyone who’s looking to avoid Chicago’s stifling humidity! (I went with my parents in July.)

Magritte considered painting a tool for thinking instead of pleasure, using unexpected images that force viewers to contemplate what we see; he intended surrealist work to overthrow the habits, customs and assumptions of the daily existence.

Before my boss began her maternity leave, I coordinated an office “sprinkle" as a send-off. And because I couldn’t ask for a better boss, I wanted to bake a cake from scratch. (That, and I don’t believe in box mixes.) 
Light, moist and bursting with fresh fruit, Smitten Kitchen’s Lime Yogurt Cake with Blackberry Sauce makes a perfect sweet for a summer afternoon. The cake would make a lovely showcase for any berry and citrus in season; I used lemons because the neighborhood Jewel-Osco was, predictably, out of limes.
And luckily, both cake and sauce come together in less than an hour—ideal if, you know, you’re not home from the office ‘til 9:00 the night before. (Since I didn’t read the instructions thoroughly ahead of time, I was pleasantly surprised to see the sauce comes together in the food processor, no simmering on the stove required.)
photo via smitten kitchen.

Before my boss began her maternity leave, I coordinated an office “sprinkle" as a send-off. And because I couldn’t ask for a better boss, I wanted to bake a cake from scratch. (That, and I don’t believe in box mixes.) 

Light, moist and bursting with fresh fruit, Smitten Kitchen’s Lime Yogurt Cake with Blackberry Sauce makes a perfect sweet for a summer afternoon. The cake would make a lovely showcase for any berry and citrus in season; I used lemons because the neighborhood Jewel-Osco was, predictably, out of limes.

And luckily, both cake and sauce come together in less than an hourideal if, you know, you’re not home from the office ‘til 9:00 the night before. (Since I didn’t read the instructions thoroughly ahead of time, I was pleasantly surprised to see the sauce comes together in the food processor, no simmering on the stove required.)

photo via smitten kitchen.

Privilege is the bandwidth to speak up and dismantle because you’re not in fear for your life. And there is no conscionable excuse for failing to use it.

sassyconfetti:

i’ve never really understood the taylor swift haterade train. i mean, come on! this song is infectious. 

It so is.

I found another way to eat kale! Last weekend I made a batch of kale pesto with some basil added for brightness. (Annie’s Eat’s recipe uses sunflower seeds instead of pine nuts, which keeps the cost down.) Since I don’t need a big pot o’ pasta all at once, I keep the pesto in the freezer and add a couple scoops to a single serving of whole wheat spaghetti or gnocchi before I eat. I top with roasted cherry tomatoes for contrasting sweetness. Bon appetit!
photo via annie’s eats.

I found another way to eat kale! Last weekend I made a batch of kale pesto with some basil added for brightness. (Annie’s Eat’s recipe uses sunflower seeds instead of pine nuts, which keeps the cost down.) Since I don’t need a big pot o’ pasta all at once, I keep the pesto in the freezer and add a couple scoops to a single serving of whole wheat spaghetti or gnocchi before I eat. I top with roasted cherry tomatoes for contrasting sweetness. Bon appetit!

photo via annie’s eats.

As a Christian called to love justice, I should be grieved, rending garments, about the structural racism that led to police brutality, to murder, in Ferguson, MO—but like many people of privilege, I can too easily ignore the racial undertones that shape our society. What can I do that will matter in the fight against racism?

Hat tip to Rachel Held Evans for sharing Janee Woods’ advice for white people to become allies on the side of justice and equity. Although I thought about trimming down Janee’s list for brevity’s sake, I don’t know how to choose.

1. Learn about the racialized history of Ferguson and how it reflects the racialized history of America.  Michael Brown’s murder is not a social anomaly or statistical outlier. It is the direct product of deadly tensions born from decades of housing discrimination, white flight, intergenerational poverty and racial profiling. The militarized police response to peaceful assembly by the people mirrors what happened in the 1960s during the Civil Rights Movement.

2. Reject the “He Was a Good Kid” narrative and lift up the “Black Lives Matter” narrative. Michael Brown was a good kid, by accounts of those who knew him during his short life. But that’s not why his death is tragic. His death isn’t tragic because he was a sweet kid on his way to college next week. His death is tragic because he was a human being and his life mattered. The Good Kid narrative might provoke some sympathy but what it really does is support the lie that as a rule black people, black men in particular, have a norm of violence or criminal behavior. The Good Kid narrative says that this kid didn’t deserve to die because his goodness was the exception to the rule. This is wrong. This kid didn’t deserve to die because he was a human being and black lives matter.

3. Use words that speak the truth about the disempowerment, oppression, disinvestment and racism that are rampant in our communities.  Be mindful, political and socially aware with your language. Notice how the mainstream news outlets are using words like riot and looting to describe the uprising in Ferguson.  What’s happening is not a riot. The people are protesting and engaging in a justified rebellion. They have a righteous anger and are revolting against the police who have terrorized them for years.

4. Understand the modern forms of race oppression and slavery and how they are intertwined with policing, the courts and the prison industrial complex.  We don’t enslave black people on the plantation cotton fields anymore. Now we lock them up in for profit prisons at disproportionate rates and for longer sentences for the same crimes than white people. And when they are released, they are second class citizens stripped of voting rights and denied access to housing, employment and education.  Mass incarceration is The New Jim Crow.

5. Examine the interplay between poverty and racial equity. The twin pillar of racism is economic injustice but do not use class issues to trump race issues and avoid the racism conversation. While racism and class oppression are tangled together in this country, the fact remains that the number one predictor of prosperity and access to opportunity is race.

6. Diversify your media. Be intentional about looking for and paying close attention to diverse voices of color on the tv, on the internet and on the radio to help shape your awareness, understanding and thinking about political, economic and social issues. Check out ColorlinesThe Root or This Week in Blackness to get started.

7. Adhere to the philosophy of nonviolence as you resist racism and oppression. Dr. Martin Luther King advocated for nonviolent conflict reconciliation as the primary strategy of the Civil Rights Movement and the charge of His Final Marching Orders.  East Point Peace Academy offers online resources and in person training on nonviolence that is accessible to all people regardless of ability to pay.

8. Find support from fellow white allies. Challenge and encourage each other to dig deeper, even when it hurts and especially when you feel confused and angry and sad and hopeless, so that you can be more authentic in your shared journey with people of color to uphold and protect principles of antiracism and equity in our society.  Go to workshops like Training for Change’s Whites Confronting Racism or European Dissentby The People’s Institute.  Attend The White Privilege Conference or the Facing Raceconference. Some organizations offer scholarships or reduced fees to help people attend if funding is an issue.

9. If you are a person of faith, look to your scriptures or holy texts for guidance. Seek out faith based organizations like Sojourners and follow faith leaders that incorporate social justice into their ministry. Ask your clergy person to address antiracism in their sermons and teachings. If you are not a person of faith, learn how the world’s religions view social justice issues so that when you have opportunity to invite people of faith to also become white allies, you can talk with them meaningfully about why being a white ally is supported by their spiritual beliefs.

10. Don’t be afraid to be unpopular. Let’s be realistic. If you start calling out all the racism you witness (and it will be a lot once you know what you’re looking at) some people might not want to hang out with you as much. That’s a risk you’ll need to accept. But think about it like this: staying silent when you witness oppression is the same as supporting oppression. So you can be the popular person who stands with the oppressor or you can be the (maybe) unpopular person who stands for equality and dignity for all people. Which person would you prefer to be? And honestly, if some people don’t want to hang out with you anymore once you show yourself as a white ally then why would you even want to be friends with them anyway? They’re probably racists.

11. Be proactive in your own community. As a white ally, you are not limited to being reactionary and only rising up to stand on the side of justice when black people are being subjected to violence very visibly and publicly. Moments of crisis do not need to be the catalyst because taking action against systemic racism is always appropriate because systemic racism permeates nearly every institution and community in this country. Some ideas for action: organize a community conversation about the state of police-community relations* in your neighborhood, support leaders of color by donating your time or money to their campaigns or causes, ask the local library to host a showing and discussion group about the documentary RACE – The Power of an Illusion, attend workshops to learn how to transform conflict into opportunity for dialogue. Gather together diverse white allies that represent the diversity of backgrounds in your community. Antiracism is not a liberals only cause. Antiracism is a movement for all people, whether they be conservative, progressive, rich, poor, urban or rural.

12. Don’t give up. We’re 400 years into this racist system and it’s going to take a long, long, long time to dismantle these atrocities. The antiracism movement is a struggle for generations, not simply the hot button issue of the moment. Transformation of a broken system doesn’t happen quickly or easily. You may not see or feel the positive impact of your white allyship in the next month, the next year, the next decade or even your lifetime. But don’t ever stop. Being a white ally matters because your thoughts, deeds and actions will be part of what turns the tide someday. Change starts with the individual.

surisburnbook:

meryl-streep:

Meryl Streep and Louisa Gummer attend ‘The Giver’ premiere at Ziegfeld Theater on August 11, 2014 in New York City.

There’s a whole other Streep daughter I didn’t know existed, and of course she’s super-pretty. I wish I could be part of this family — fashion sense, lots of sisters, actual talent.

surisburnbook:

meryl-streep:

Meryl Streep and Louisa Gummer attend ‘The Giver’ premiere at Ziegfeld Theater on August 11, 2014 in New York City.

There’s a whole other Streep daughter I didn’t know existed, and of course she’s super-pretty. I wish I could be part of this family — fashion sense, lots of sisters, actual talent.

Deb from Smitten Kitchen made a liar out of me. A few years ago, only months after a disaster that almost made me hate hummus, Best Friend Lauren and I prepared a batch of hummus that totally changed my tune. After one bite, I declared Paula Wolfert’s Hummus the unequivocal best.

Nope! I’m eating my words as I’m eating Ethereally Smooth Hummus, a Smitten Kitchen adaptation of an Ottolenghi recipe that towers above the rest. I’m only a little sad I missed the chance to make Ethereally Smooth Hummus over the past few years!