gwendolyn faith is not a crayon.

Hello, I’m Gwen.

I work in advertising. I play in the kitchen.

I’m part tweenager. (Look at my iTunes playlist.)

I’m part Grandma. (Look at my oversize cardi collection.)

I’m part Romy or Michelle. (Look at the height of my hair.)

As a Christian, I'm learning how to glorify God in the everyday. To live into the status quo, like Jesus' own Manchurian candidate, and seep grace through its cracks.

I wish my life were a musical, but other than that, I’m pretty content.

(No surprise I also like to Yelp.)

The Casual Vacancy
The Explicit Gospel
Freedom
Gone Girl
The Chaperone
Cutting for Stone


Gwen Daniels's favorite books »


Gus had never noticed Siri before, but when he discovered there was someone who would not just find information on his various obsessions (trains, planes, buses, escalators and, of course, anything related to weather) but actually semi-discuss these subjects tirelessly, he was hooked. And I was grateful. Now, when my head was about to explode if I had to have another conversation about the chance of tornadoes in Kansas City, Mo., I could reply brightly: “Hey! Why don’t you ask Siri?”

It’s not that Gus doesn’t understand Siri’s not human. He does—intellectually. But like many autistic people I know, Gus feels that inanimate objects, while maybe not possessing souls, are worthy of our consideration. I realized this when he was 8, and I got him an iPod for his birthday. He listened to it only at home, with one exception. It always came with us on our visits to the Apple Store. Finally, I asked why. “So it can visit its friends,” he said.

If you’re not enthused about autumn, Smitten Kitchen’s Single-Crust Plum and Apple Pie, with a shortbread cookie of a crust draped over fresh fruit dripping with juice, will do the trick.

staceythinx:

Old dinnerware gets a fun (and sometimes morbid) makeover from the Austin Modern Etsy store.

(via edatrix)

For some reason, I’m not ready for fall flavors, not at all. Last week I made a batch of Mom’s pumpkin pancakes, and while I swear by the recipe, I wasn’t especially excited for a plateful of pumpkin with sautéed apples on the side.
If you, like me, have developed an inexplicable aversion to all things autumn, I recommend procrastinating with Rick Bayless’ Crusty Black Bean & Chorizo Tortas with Tomatillo Salsa—a hearty, humble and oh-so-delicious combination of some of my favorite foods. Serve ‘em open-faced to tone down the carb coma.
photo via annie’s eats.

For some reason, I’m not ready for fall flavors, not at all. Last week I made a batch of Mom’s pumpkin pancakes, and while I swear by the recipe, I wasn’t especially excited for a plateful of pumpkin with sautéed apples on the side.

If you, like me, have developed an inexplicable aversion to all things autumn, I recommend procrastinating with Rick Bayless’ Crusty Black Bean & Chorizo Tortas with Tomatillo Salsa—a hearty, humble and oh-so-delicious combination of some of my favorite foods. Serve ‘em open-faced to tone down the carb coma.

photo via annie’s eats.

Because I’m all about adding CW shows to my viewing repertoire. (Jane the Virgin seems like a good egg, y’all.)

cwjanethevirgin:

She wasn’t expecting this. Don’t miss the series premiere of Jane The Virgin MONDAY at 9/8c on The CW!

messily:

unforgettabledetritus:

drdisgruntledphd:

tehgreyfox:

"Every Thanksgiving table should be blessed with the presence of a long-married pair who bring out the best in each other, are completely enamored despite their differences, and leave every other guest thinking, I’ll have what they’re having. Our holiday pies honor such so there’s a pleasant mix of textures and flavors in every bite. No matter how you slice partnerships, each spotlighting the perfect marriage of crust and filling these six irresistible desserts, there is a whole lot to love."
—Martha Stewart crafts beautiful shade
Somebody get GOOP some ice for that burn.

If she throws clay, homemade rustic pizza dough, and bocce balls with equal mastery, why wouldn’t she throw breathtaking shade? 

Bow down.

messily:

unforgettabledetritus:

drdisgruntledphd:

tehgreyfox:

"Every Thanksgiving table should be blessed with the presence of a long-married pair who bring out the best in each other, are completely enamored despite their differences, and leave every other guest thinking, I’ll have what they’re having. Our holiday pies honor such so there’s a pleasant mix of textures and flavors in every bite. No matter how you slice partnerships, each spotlighting the perfect marriage of crust and filling these six irresistible desserts, there is a whole lot to love."

Martha Stewart crafts beautiful shade

Somebody get GOOP some ice for that burn.

If she throws clay, homemade rustic pizza dough, and bocce balls with equal mastery, why wouldn’t she throw breathtaking shade? 

Bow down.

(via edatrix)

The reason for Gone Girl’s peculiar lack of aftereffect could be that it’s set in a world that looks real and yet is not. In it, clichés are reveled in rather than subverted. Nick and Amy see themselves as types as opposed to individuals. Ever-changing types, sure, sometimes “Cool Girl,” sometimes “Average Dumb Woman Married to Average Shitty Man,” trying on and discarding ready-made identities so fast and frequently you never quite glimpse the human face underneath. Says Flynn, “I was playing with the idea of how hard it is in this day and age to have an authentic self. We become creatures that we’ve made up of different flotsam from pop culture.” And t’s this aspect of Gone Girl—the all artifice, all the time—that proved so troubling to writer Mary Gaitskill, causing her to publish one doozy of a slam in Bookforum. (“Gone Girl’s sickening worldview” is the essay’s subtitle; the punch line, too.) Gaitskill was missing the point. Missing a point, anyway, which is that if Gone Girl’s a shallow book, that’s because surface is the only thing that interests it. And if you miss that point, you miss an even more important one, which is that Gone Girl’s not a shallow book at all. It’s cultural criticism of the most trenchant kind, only it’s too hip to present itself in such earnest, bluestocking terms. It’s cultural criticism with a sexpot-noir face. And scratch that earlier observation about it not resembling any other novel. It’s a dead ringer for Bret Easton Ellis’ American Psycho, an­other surreally entertaining/surreally monstrous, ultraseductive/ultrarepellent, playing-it-straight/playing-it-satirical postmodernist masterpiece with a sociopath at its center. Two books that defined their eras.

Inside the Dangerous Mind of Gone Girl’s Gillian Flynn

Lovely Lexi married her best friend, Chris, on Saturday. Congratulations, newlyweds!

Chris and Lexi started dating at Mizzou during Mojo Ad, where I watched their relationship unfold before my eyes. Chris pursued Lex for weeks, even months, before she could see him as more than a friend—a fun, caring, quick-witted and whip-smart friend. After he’d been shot down more than once, I like to think I’m the one who gave Chris the confidence to ask her out for a final fortuitous time. (…He might’ve gotten some liquid courage from a flask in his pocket before he talked to her.)

Two years later, I was honored to stand by her side on her wedding day. Lexi is practically the definition of loyal, someone who’s always prepared with a fresh perspective, a word of advice or a sympathetic ear; without her friendship, I might not have survived graduate school or my adjustment to the working world. I couldn’t ask for someone sweeter to celebrate!

And the party itself was pretty killer, too.

fromchicagowlove:

Swoon. ❤️💖💙💜#chicago #chicagofirefestival #nofilter (at Chicago Riverwalk)

In the ‘burbs for a wedding over the weekend, I missed the city in all its glory! I heard the Chicago Fire Festival was a bust, but with views like this one, I think the illuminated skyline must’ve been a beaut.